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  • Here's an interesting story:

    15 years ago (before 9/11), when I was younger and harder, I was in 20th Special Forces Group, working hard to get my tab. I won't bore you with the details, but it basically involved racing locomotives, jumping over tall buildings with a single bound, bouncing bullets off my chest, that sort of thing. I was doing individual training for selection one day by doing a 7 mile timed ruck run with a 75 lb pack, while carrying a 50 cal ammo can full of sand (26 lbs). My route started at the SF Armory in Ocala, went out of town a few miles then ended back at the armory. I was in full military uniform and carrying issued field gear, and stayed on the side of the road.

    About an hour and a half into the ruck a Marion county deputy slid into a stop in front of me, blocking the road I was about to cross. He got out with his weapon drawn and demanded that I stop, drop my gear, and explain what I was doing. I complied, knowing that my training was ruined for the day. I explained what I was doing to the deputy, showed him my military ID, drew a strip map to my unit and the route I had taken, and waited for him to run my info.

    I never reported it to the department, and when I got back to my unit, it was more like, "Sarge you're never gonna believe this S***". I never pursued it because, at that time, I still believed in showing another officer professional courtesy and giving him the benefit of the doubt when it came to questionable actions. Plus, that was before I became a single parent, and I still wanted to be a cop back then. I figured that was the wrong way to get noticed by a department I wanted to apply at.

    It was encounters like this on and off the job, that helped me decide to leave law enforcement. It's a tough job, and not for everyone. It's also made tougher by the minority of dicks that gravitate toward positions of authority and abuse their power.
    The deputy was aggressive and derisive. He didn't believe anything I said and made me dump my ruck (it had some field gear, MREs, water, and sand bags in it for weight). He ridiculed me for hiking with all that gear in the heat and said he suspected me because I was training alone instead of with the rest of my unit, because he never heard of a soldier doing that kind of training alone on his own time.

    He contacted my unit (no answer of course) and started lecturing me about how I shouldn't be scaring people by carrying what looked like explosives and "assault gear" in public. He referred to my "militia unit" and asked several times if I was a member of any paramilitary group. I told him, "Listen, I got nothing but respect for officers. I am a military police officer for my regular job and know what you guys go through".
    He then started telling me that I had no idea what "real cops" deal with and I was wrong for training in a manner that was likely to cause panic by the general population. After about 15 minutes of this I got pissed and told him, "Unless you want to charge me with something, I'm going, but before I leave, I want your name and badge number. I guarantee that your department has vets in leadership positions who would be interested in knowing that you are harassing soldiers serving the country."

    He backed off a little, made a feeble apology and pulled off while I was repacking my ruck I never reported him.

    There is a point to all this. I was as clean cut as a person can be, was in the Army, was a certified LEO, and was carrying nothing more threatening than a large ALICE pack and big green steel box on the side of a country road and got screwed with by a deputy for no real reason. I got shook down and insulted, despite obviously being one of the good guys and clearly not breaking any law. I'm just glad that I didn't take the rubber duck that the supply clerk offered me, I might have been shot despite the fact that it would be legal for me to train like I was with an actual firearm!!

    It was encounters like this on and off the job, that helped me decide to leave law enforcement. It's a tough job, and not for everyone. It's also made tougher by the minority of dicks that gravitate toward positions of authority and abuse their power.

  • #2
    Re: Here's an interesting story:

    For me it was the corruption and ass-kissing that made me leave. Not to mention working in the sleaziest and second most dangerous county in the state.
    [I]Peace Through Strength, Victory Through Devastation...Strategic Air Command[/I]

    American by birth, made from German parts from Emmingen, Baden-Württemberg

    An unhappy German is a Sour Kraut!

    Das Leben ist zu kurz, um billiges Bier zu trinken!

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    • #3
      Re: Here's an interesting story:

      Originally posted by ISC View Post
      15 years ago (before 9/11), when I was younger and harder, I was in 20th Special Forces Group, working hard to get my tab. I won't bore you with the details, but it basically involved racing locomotives, jumping over tall buildings with a single bound, bouncing bullets off my chest, that sort of thing. I was doing individual training for selection one day by doing a 7 mile timed ruck run with a 75 lb pack, while carrying a 50 cal ammo can full of sand (26 lbs). My route started at the SF Armory in Ocala, went out of town a few miles then ended back at the armory. I was in full military uniform and carrying issued field gear, and stayed on the side of the road.

      About an hour and a half into the ruck a Marion county deputy slid into a stop in front of me, blocking the road I was about to cross. He got out with his weapon drawn and demanded that I stop, drop my gear, and explain what I was doing. I complied, knowing that my training was ruined for the day. I explained what I was doing to the deputy, showed him my military ID, drew a strip map to my unit and the route I had taken, and waited for him to run my info.

      I never reported it to the department, and when I got back to my unit, it was more like, "Sarge you're never gonna believe this S***". I never pursued it because, at that time, I still believed in showing another officer professional courtesy and giving him the benefit of the doubt when it came to questionable actions. Plus, that was before I became a single parent, and I still wanted to be a cop back then. I figured that was the wrong way to get noticed by a department I wanted to apply at.

      It was encounters like this on and off the job, that helped me decide to leave law enforcement. It's a tough job, and not for everyone. It's also made tougher by the minority of dicks that gravitate toward positions of authority and abuse their power.
      The deputy was aggressive and derisive. He didn't believe anything I said and made me dump my ruck (it had some field gear, MREs, water, and sand bags in it for weight). He ridiculed me for hiking with all that gear in the heat and said he suspected me because I was training alone instead of with the rest of my unit, because he never heard of a soldier doing that kind of training alone on his own time.

      He contacted my unit (no answer of course) and started lecturing me about how I shouldn't be scaring people by carrying what looked like explosives and "assault gear" in public. He referred to my "militia unit" and asked several times if I was a member of any paramilitary group. I told him, "Listen, I got nothing but respect for officers. I am a military police officer for my regular job and know what you guys go through".
      He then started telling me that I had no idea what "real cops" deal with and I was wrong for training in a manner that was likely to cause panic by the general population. After about 15 minutes of this I got pissed and told him, "Unless you want to charge me with something, I'm going, but before I leave, I want your name and badge number. I guarantee that your department has vets in leadership positions who would be interested in knowing that you are harassing soldiers serving the country."

      He backed off a little, made a feeble apology and pulled off while I was repacking my ruck I never reported him.

      There is a point to all this. I was as clean cut as a person can be, was in the Army, was a certified LEO, and was carrying nothing more threatening than a large ALICE pack and big green steel box on the side of a country road and got screwed with by a deputy for no real reason. I got shook down and insulted, despite obviously being one of the good guys and clearly not breaking any law. I'm just glad that I didn't take the rubber duck that the supply clerk offered me, I might have been shot despite the fact that it would be legal for me to train like I was with an actual firearm!!

      It was encounters like this on and off the job, that helped me decide to leave law enforcement. It's a tough job, and not for everyone. It's also made tougher by the minority of dicks that gravitate toward positions of authority and abuse their power.
      This sounds all too familiar. I know how much my name has been dirtied up " unofficially " .
      I lost most of my respect or regard for the likes of my " betters" a LONG time ago. I'm pretty much blacklisted in NH for NOT losing my case or being convicted. Imagine that.
      Gregory Peter DuPont

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