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best MREs and source for same?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I'd tried some 10+ year old MREs stored in a tin storage shed.

    Everything was still good enough to eat, except the candy.

    Really surprised any of it was good, due to various temp.

    TG

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  • ISC
    replied
    That's a good link Tim, but like alot of things you can at least double the conservative estimates which are the minimums they make out of liability concerns. I was still occasionally seeing (and eating) dark brown wrapper MREs in the supply chain in 2000 and they were discontinued after the first gulf war.

    I went to a gun show awhile back and someone had Vietnam dated C-rats for sale. One adventurous old nam vet boought one and proceeded to eat the apricots. He wasn't sick at the end of the show that day or the next, although he did say (with a little wry grin) that he remembered them tasting better.

    I read plenty of stories about Vietnam era soldiers eating WWII dated C rats as a matter of course, and they weren't even irradiated like MREs are today.

    Bottom line is that as long as it isn't swollen or smell bad when you open it, old MREs will still be safe to eat, even if they taste a little gross.

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  • TimW
    replied
    http://www.sopakco.com/faq_mreshelflife.html

    I swear, how hard is it to Google "MRE Shelf Life"?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by ISC:
    I've heard MREs stay good for 14 years and are safe to eat longer then that although their nutritional content degrades and the food will turn into a tasteless mush.
    How long they stay good depends on the storage temperature. Keep em at 100+ degrees and they will only last a few months, if that.

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  • ISC
    replied
    I've heard MREs stay good for 14 years and are safe to eat longer then that although their nutritional content degrades and the food will turn into a tasteless mush.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I've been rotating my older MREs & using them for back packing,fishing and soon hunting.

    Recently purchased five cases of MREs for $50,only down side, their almost two years old.

    Have yet purchased any freeze dried, seen some at wally world, might have to try it some day.

    Had a link, where ones could purchased large cans of pork & other entries.

    Be good for long term storage.

    TG

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  • ISC
    replied
    I'd like to add that Jambalaya is the worst MRE ever made. Its always the last one to get picked and I've seen many hungry soldiers refuse to eat the entre and collect wheat snack bread or whatever other guys had left over instead of eating the jambalaya. It tastes like old tennis shoes and smells like rotton pu55y.

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  • ISC
    replied
    sopacko or something like that... they suck

    I agree with Dunkel's assessment, except I think the BBQ rib is really good instead of decent, especially if you heat it up.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I been eating some commercial MRE's in the clear plastic package. They are not as nice as the regular army ones. The fruit bars are sometimes moldy, the trail mix gets old since it is in almost every one. The main entrees are not bad and I miss the applesauce which they do not have. No candies to suck on. They just don't compare to the real thing.

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  • paintballmagnet
    replied
    One big advantage of MRE's is in the name, Ready to eat. Freeze drieds take quantities of water and time to prepare, both of which might be in short supply during certain scenarios. Both have their place, if I had to choose only one to stock, MRE's would win out.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    http://www.mredepot.com/servlet/StoreFront

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Why not just go to the commisary? They're cheaper there (comparitively speaking of course) than outside vendors.

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  • LAWCOP
    replied
    Originally posted by Duncan M:
    I hate to say it but for the price MRE's are going for why not go with a lighter and more stable food?

    Two words for you = FREEZE DRIED!
    I AM a BIG fan of freeze dried. I have never bit into an MRE that could match what the folks at Mountain House produce.
    ALSO
    IF you buy enough at a time you can get a distributor price on it and it saves FOREVER...
    I got into it through a friend who has about 2 years of it stored up. Tried it and have presently about 4-5 months of freeze dry backup.

    We buy in together and get about $500 at a time and it saves about 40% from store prices but IIRC the discounts start at $300.00
    .
    We both use it for regular eats when we want to fix something quick instead of waiting for the end of the world. The Beef stew is great and so are the chicken meals. Then you can always extend it with noodles or rice or even bread.
    PLUS it is really light weight and stores very easily and well.
    All you need is hot water and in 10 minutes you have a great meal.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I hate to say it but for the price MRE's are going for why not go with a lighter and more stable food?

    Two words for you = FREEZE DRIED!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    you can buy civilian model mres from catalogs. you might want to avoid any suppliers that may have already expended much of their shelf. there should be lot numbers on the crates and the customer support should have access to this information. if they dont its only a phone call away for them. remember, most of these cases will be about $60 so its a decent investment and if they are not willing to make the sale, then it may not be worth the gamble.

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