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  • Resoling/Retreading your Jungle Boots

    G'day, guys.

    I was wondering, what kind of replacement treads would be good for a pair of Altama Black Mil-Spec Jungle Boots with the Panama soles? The reason why I'm asking because over the past few weeks, I've been thinking about getting the treads on my Jungle Boots replaced on the grounds that they are beginning to wear out.

    Since I've had these boots for nearly 2 years (these boots were a replacement pair for the ones I got for my 27th birthday in October 2008 after the steel shank in the sole went and started to make a lot of noise while I walked), I'm not keen on shelling out a lot of money to buy a new pair of Jungle Boots (a new pair of Altama Black Mil-Spec Jungle Boots here in Australia costs around the $250.00AUD mark) and having them retreaded would be a cheaper option.

    In regards to replacement treads for my Jungle Boots, I'm currently thinking about getting either the Vibram Roccia or Montagna treads since my Black GP Boots have a Roccia/Montagna tread on them and I figured that they would be good enough for my Jungle Boots.

    If anybody who has had their Jungle Boots resoled or retreaded, any information on what treads would be good would be helpful. Thanks.
    Last edited by Roughneck Jase; April 8, 2011, 18:21.
    If you want peace then prepare for war - Ancient Roman maxim

  • #2
    Re: Resoling/Retreading your Jungle Boots

    I did mine with ripple soles. I used to buy the cheap chinese boots for $20 then pay $60 to get them resoled. If you just wore them without resoling, the vulcanization failed after just a hundred miles or so and you'd have a blowout. By getting new chinese boots resoled with upgrade soles I'd have a new pair of custom boots for $85. Alot of us did it before going to SFAS and SFQC.

    The ripple soles were most popular, but they did sometimes collect small stones in the ripples which were a bit of a hassle when running. I also had the toe and heel cups removed as well as the spkie protector. They felt like tennis shoes afterwards and lasted a long time.

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    • #3
      Re: Resoling/Retreading your Jungle Boots

      I have always favored the Vibram soles, and my set of late 1980s vintage Jungle boots were my favorite until the were declared no longer suitable with the uniform standard (I forget when they did it, but they said the green sided jungle boots were a no-go sometime in the early 1990s). Now I can't find them, may have tossed/lost them at some point.

      So back in the early 1990s, looking for a new "favorite" pair of boots the "in thing" was the goretex lined Matterhorns. I traded an SKS for a pair that a guy in my unit bought on his DPP card I think around $125. (The SKS had cost me $99). I never wore them exactly "full time" for a lot of ruck marches but did wear them a lot, with the soles not really wearing down heavily until around 2005, and then in 2008 I started wearing them for work when I noticed how quickly other boots wear out. Cost me $60 to resole them with another set of Vibram soles but I think the newer soles are thicker and more heavy duty than original. Thus, with the weight I don't wear those boots all the time any more anyway and get cheapo "hiking shoes" and "boots" at places like Wally world and Big-5. No joke, inside of a month I managed to blow the heel area out of my last set of Big-5 hiking boots.

      Not sure what that "ripple" sole is, but it seems that every set of lug soled boots I ever owned picks up little rocks and dirt clods to the point I was always under the impression that off road traction and picking up crap go hand in hand. Those old "waffle" pattern combat boots from the 1980s were made to last a long time but got slippery under a lot of circumstances.
      Life, Liberty and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

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      • #4
        Re: Resoling/Retreading your Jungle Boots

        Being down under adds a lot of $$$ due to postage. We have some good options in the USA with davepagecobbler.com or http://resole.com/Military-Boots-Repair.aspx

        I have used Dave's services for many years- a real pro. Resole.com is also good to go.

        But.... you get hammered on postage where you are.

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        • #5
          Re: Resoling/Retreading your Jungle Boots

          Originally posted by koreamarine View Post
          Being down under adds a lot of $$$ due to postage. We have some good options in the USA with davepagecobbler.com or http://resole.com/Military-Boots-Repair.aspx

          I have used Dave's services for many years- a real pro. Resole.com is also good to go.

          But.... you get hammered on postage where you are.
          Thanks for that, koreamarine. However, I've already had my Altama Jungle Boots resoled by a local, commercial shoe repair shop. I just recently picked them up today and I was impressed by the work.

          The repairers replaced the worn-out Panama sole with a Vibram-type pattern sole called the "Greenland" sole (the company that resoled my boots use this type of shoe/boot sole when they resole work boots and Australian Army General Purpose Boots). When I look at the treads, they kind of remind me of the Vibram soles that were used on the Vietnam-era Jungle Boots.

          On another note, koreamarine; I agree with you about the postage costs of shipping items to and from Australia and other parts of the world. If I had to choose between buying a pair of US military combat boots in Australia or ordering a pair from the US, I choose to buy them locally. Even though buying them would cost me a small fortune, at least I get to try the product before I buy it and if anything goes wrong with the product, I could easily contact them and get a refund or an exchange.
          Last edited by Roughneck Jase; December 5, 2011, 22:55.
          If you want peace then prepare for war - Ancient Roman maxim

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          • #6
            Re: Resoling/Retreading your Jungle Boots

            Originally posted by ISC View Post
            I did mine with ripple soles. I used to buy the cheap chinese boots for $20 then pay $60 to get them resoled. If you just wore them without resoling, the vulcanization failed after just a hundred miles or so and you'd have a blowout. By getting new chinese boots resoled with upgrade soles I'd have a new pair of custom boots for $85. Alot of us did it before going to SFAS and SFQC.

            The ripple soles were most popular, but they did sometimes collect small stones in the ripples which were a bit of a hassle when running. I also had the toe and heel cups removed as well as the spkie protector. They felt like tennis shoes afterwards and lasted a long time.
            ISC,

            In regards to your Jungle Boots, did you by any chance able to remove the steel shank from the boot's sole?

            The reason why I'm asking is because I've been checking out a few US military forums in which the members say that they removed the steel shank from their jungle boots as part of breaking them in. In addition, if the sole in my J-Boots start making a sound due to the shank being broken or displaced; I want to be able to remove them without damaging the boot.
            If you want peace then prepare for war - Ancient Roman maxim

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            • #7
              Re: Resoling/Retreading your Jungle Boots

              Originally posted by Roughneck Jase View Post
              G'day, guys.

              I was wondering, what kind of replacement treads would be good for a pair of Altama Black Mil-Spec Jungle Boots with the Panama soles? The reason why I'm asking because over the past few weeks, I've been thinking about getting the treads on my Jungle Boots replaced on the grounds that they are beginning to wear out.

              ...
              Hey Roughneck Jase, have you contacted Altama for a set of replacement soles for your boots? I'd recommend going with original if possible.

              Any way you go, make sure your 'cobbler' seals well the sole to upper seams when they're done, it makes them last longer and are always more comfortable with dry feet.

              IHTH

              Michael
              Last edited by C. M. Wolf; December 11, 2011, 03:09.

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              • #8
                Re: Resoling/Retreading your Jungle Boots

                Originally posted by C. M. Wolf View Post
                Hey Roughneck Jase, have you contacted Altama for a set of replacement soles for your boots? I'd recommend going with original if possible.

                Any way you go, make sure your 'cobbler' seals well the sole to upper seams when they're done, it makes them last longer and are always more comfortable with dry feet.

                IHTH

                Michael
                C. M. Wolf,

                Sadly, I haven't contacted Altama and I've already had my boots resoled by a local shoe repairer. Also, the local shoe repairer has a considerable amount of experience in resoling military boots of various types (including US military Jungle Boots). Besides, I'm trying to save up a bit of money to buy myself a new pair from L.E. GEAR (they're a military/law enforcement clothing and equipment company on the Gold Coast and they were the guys I brought my Altama J-Boots from).

                In regards to contacting Altama in getting my soles replaced, do Altama accept and repair boots from overseas owners? From what I've seen on their website, there's nothing about it and the company won't take international orders at this present stage.

                On another note, C. M. Wolf. Is it possible to remove the steel shank from the Altama Jungle Boot via the insole? I've been reading about it on a few Internet forums and I was wondering if this is feasable if the shank in the Jungle Boot break and the boots start to make a clicking sound when worn.
                Last edited by Roughneck Jase; December 11, 2011, 17:59.
                If you want peace then prepare for war - Ancient Roman maxim

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                • #9
                  Re: Resoling/Retreading your Jungle Boots

                  G'day again everybody.

                  A month or two ago, the left boot of my recently resoled Altama Jungle Boots started to make a clicking/popping noise when I flexed the toe. I took the boots back to the repairers to see if the shanks had went and the boots came back okay in the shank department. I discovered that the floorplate inside my left boot was cracked and it was making the noise. I plan on taking the boots to the repairers again to see if they could rectify the problem (there's a 6 month warranty on the boots by the repairers so I might as well see them sometime this week).

                  On another note, I recently picked up a new pair of Altama Black Mil-Spec Jungle Boots from L.E. Gear down on the Gold Coast. The boots set me back around $245 AUD and they are in US Size 12 Wide (my old boots were in Size 12 Regular). Having worn Jungle Boots in both Size 12 Regular and Wide, I find that the Wide version to be better than the Regular version in terms of comfort.
                  Last edited by Roughneck Jase; April 7, 2012, 22:38.
                  If you want peace then prepare for war - Ancient Roman maxim

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