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  • midget round

    didn't know what to call it , so midget it is

    after repeated loading and unloading of the top round in the mag ( SigPro 2340 ) have noticed the bullet has been pushed back into the casing.

    it obvious the round is shorter than the rest.

    will this effect the round ?

    higher pressure ?

    ballistics ?

    any input appreciated

    thanks

  • #2
    Re: midget round

    I've seen those from time to time. I don't know what the physics are regarding safety, but I've fired some and didn't see problems. I've since decided not to fire them, but as I said, not because I have any science to back the decision up.

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    • #3
      Re: midget round

      It is said "Do Not Fire It". It is reported to up the pressure because of compacted powder.
      Youth And Brawn Are No Match For Age And Treachery.
      I'm Old And May Not Fight. I'll Shoot Instead.

      USMC 1959/1963

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      • #4
        Re: midget round

        Originally posted by TheMrMitch View Post
        It is said "Do Not Fire It". It is reported to up the pressure because of compacted powder.
        Depends on the powder.

        I'm a bit cautious about factory loads that do that, because I don't know if I'm compressing the powder or not, but my own loads?

        I tend to buy pistol powder based on the grain weight per load. Which means that I'm loading a lot of Winchester 231 or Red Dot, which usually goes further. And it also only fills the case about half full.

        Which means that you aren't going to compress it unless you stuff the bullet about all the way into the case neck. If you are concerned, pull one and see what the powder volume in the case actually is. It's really the only way to be sure, If you are, in fact, compressing it, it could get really ugly, worst case.

        Know what you are shooting, and react accordingly. The best course of action is that if in doubt, don't shoot it. Take it apart and find out.



        If you are reloading, a good "factory crimp" die will solve most of that kind of problem, too. I hate pulling bullets that I've reloaded, because when I'm done, they take some serious hammering!
        Last edited by jefferson101; February 23rd, 2009, 19:13.
        Alle Kunst ist umsunst Wenn ein Engel auf das Zundloch brunzet (All skill is in vain if an angel pisses down the touch-hole of your musket.) Old German Folk Wisdom.

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        • #5
          Re: midget round

          thanks for the replies

          have started a collection of "ugly" rounds

          once one starts to get too deformed it goes in the jar.

          will "dissect' one someday and see if there's any room for the powder and maybe get brave and fire a couple

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          • #6
            Re: midget round

            FWIW, I just shoot them.

            But it's my face and hands in the blast zone if something goes wrong. So always do what you think what you have to do in order to be safe.



            While I would never suggest that anyone do anything I wouldn't, there are several things that I will do which I would not tell anyone else to imitate. And this is one of them.

            Body parts are hard to replace. If you think that you even MIGHT be endangering any of them, best to throw the round off to the side and use something else.

            And you can take that one to the Bank.



            I usually see that condition with my P-14 or the Brolin that I have converted to 400 CorBon. And I know what I'm shooting in them, and trust the firearms to be stout. But there are limits, even there. Just be careful, and know your ammo.
            Last edited by jefferson101; February 23rd, 2009, 20:53.
            Alle Kunst ist umsunst Wenn ein Engel auf das Zundloch brunzet (All skill is in vain if an angel pisses down the touch-hole of your musket.) Old German Folk Wisdom.

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            • #7
              Re: midget round

              It is much safer to use a bullet puller to pull the bullet and start over.
              That is the only thing I would recommend and they are not very expensive.
              VERITAS VINCIT
              A CRUCE SALUS

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              • #8
                Re: midget round

                Same powder charge in a smaller space, higher pressure, higher temperature, initial burn rate changed by that which then gives what else I don't know. A jar is a good place for all that unknowableness.

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                • #9
                  Re: midget round

                  Use a bullet puller (impact) to seat the bullet back out to spec. Simplest answer. (Use light taps until proper length achieved.)

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                  • #10
                    Re: midget round

                    a bullet puller is one tool i am lacking

                    these "mutant" rounds are now residing in a jar

                    too bad they didn't make ammo for daily loading/unloading for safety nuts like me

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