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Stupid ammo question, how to tell reloads

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  • Stupid ammo question, how to tell reloads

    I should know this but I dont. Ive been asked if the 1000 rds of 7.62x51 I'm selling is reloads. I don't think they are, primers are all brass colored, can see the red around them, is there anyway to tell for sure?

  • #2
    one way to tell is if they are military,they will have discoloration around the neck and shoulder,like a heat mark.They are military reloads.pretty much everything ya get from the military is reloaded.If that is what ya mean by reloaded.

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    • #3
      Ding the picture you posted is of a case that has been annealed, a process that hardens the brass it isn't an indicator of it being fired. Most of the necked down rifle bullets will have this discoloration, few straight case bullets will have any Annealing done to them because there is no need of a heat treatment that alters the micro structure of a material causing changes in properties such as strength and hardness.

      The only way to know for sure is to know your seller, if you are worried pull a bullet and examine the insides of the case for pitts or out of spec lenghth.

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      • #4
        Ding the picture you posted is of a case that has been annealed, a process that hardens the brass
        WRONG !!

        annealing SOFTENS the brass

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        • #5
          So you are telling me that a necked down bullet should have softer brass? All of the firearms ammunitions makers that I see on the internet say they treat the brass this way to make it more durable. How did you come up with your information?

          Remington states:

          Remington Cartridge Brass
          As the toughest and most formable in the industry, our cartridge cases are carefully drawn from specially-alloyed brass to provide consistently exact internal volume and resistance to case stretching and brittleness. Primer pocket tolerances are held to .001". Finally, closely monitored case neck annealing assures easier re-sizing and longer reloading life.

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          • #6
            Guys,it was the only picture of brass I had.True it is hard to tell reloads and I agree with know your supplier.It was for to give an idea of what to look for,that's all..

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Duncan M:
              So you are telling me that a necked down bullet should have softer brass? All of the firearms ammunitions makers that I see on the internet say they treat the brass this way to make it more durable. How did you come up with your information?

              Remington states:

              Remington Cartridge Brass
              As the toughest and most formable in the industry, our cartridge cases are carefully drawn from specially-alloyed brass to provide consistently exact internal volume and resistance to case stretching and brittleness. Primer pocket tolerances are held to .001". Finally, closely monitored case neck annealing assures easier re-sizing and longer reloading life.
              Wildman is right!
              Exactly, annealing softens the brass to keep it from getting brittle and spliting or cracking. READ YOUR QUOTE "resistance to case stretching and brittleness", that's annealing. Heat arranges brass molocules randomly (making it pliable/soft), working brass;ie: shooting, sizing, age as in exposed to hot/cool cycles aligns the molocules making the brass brittle. So....to answer your question, yes, necked down brass is soft only where the annealing appears, the rest it relativly hard. Annealing is an art of it's own, soften the brass too far down the case and you will have a case rupture, anneal down to the base and the whole thing may fly apart. Read up on it, there is a lot to it, ain't as easy as it appears.

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