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Black Powder Pistols for Defense

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  • Black Powder Pistols for Defense

    I never thought I would consider the possibilities for ever owning a blackpowder, but here it goes...

    https://www.cabelas.com/browse.cmd?C...black%2Bpowder

    I was looking for short term contract jobs in CA, and in order to protect myself without getting a CA drivers license, and losing my current concealed carry licenses, I was thinking on getting a black powder revolver (if I do go to CA). From my short read, it seems the 1858 style Remington is the best, since their cylinders swap out easy. However, there are Confederate pistols with a greater capacity. However, I am leaning toward the 1858 black powder since they are easy to swap and are relatively inexpensive and there are a few cheap on gun broker.

    What do you need to reload black powder? Are Bass Pro and Cabela's a good place to get stuff?

    I assume a steel frame is better than a brass frame?

    New model is better (1858 versus 1847)?

    Any better/newer models than 1858?

    Where do you get high capacity Confederate models?
    I have a Right to my Life; I have a Right to the Fruits of my Labor. If you concede the principle of the Income Tax, you concede the principle that the government owns ALL your income and permits you to keep a certain percentage of it.
    ─Ron Paul, interview by Time on Sep 17, 2009.

  • #2
    It appears from my reading that the steel framed revolvers are superior to brass ones.

    Not all of the modern reproductions are 100% true to the original form. (who cares) For example, the original Navy pistols seem to fire only the 36 cal lead balls while the Army ones seem to use the 44 cal, whereas the modern Navys firing 44 cal in addition to 36 cal.

    The longer barrels are essential to muzzle velocity, the longer the better.

    The Ruger Old Army is very desirable but out of production and the cheapest I've seen for a well worn one is $400 plus ship on gunbroker. Some gunbroker ads still want to ship to an FLL (and they are FFLs besides). Someday Ruger *might* have another run of them, like the Mini 14 of old.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruger_Old_Army

    There are a lot of 1851 Navy's out there, but the later ones I would think would be sturdier.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colt_1851_Navy_Revolver

    The 1858 Remington style seems to be the best due to ability to change out cylinders most easily. In addition, it has the backstrap on the top of the cylinder that the earlier ones do not for durability.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remington_Model_1858

    The 1860 Army revolvers do not seem to have any advantage to the 1858 Remington.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colt_Army_Model_1860

    I read that Uberti appears to be better made than Pietta. Don't know if the 1858 Uberti can use the 1858 Pietta cylinders. In theory you'd think yes.

    Don't know if stainless is an advantage. Read that it might be harder to acquire a sight picture in bright sunlight.

    Some sources for new black powder pistols are: Cabela's, Midway. But I read of people acquiring them from garage sales, flea markets, estate sales. In fact I sold a black powder rifle and pistol for my neighbor years back on the WAC show.

    Lot of people prefer real black powder than the modern equivalents: Alliant Muzzle Powder, Pyrodex. Black powder is scarce everywhere.
    I have a Right to my Life; I have a Right to the Fruits of my Labor. If you concede the principle of the Income Tax, you concede the principle that the government owns ALL your income and permits you to keep a certain percentage of it.
    ─Ron Paul, interview by Time on Sep 17, 2009.

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    • #3
      I have two of the 1858 revolvers. A Uberti with a 5 1/2" barrel and a Pietta with a 7 1/2" and adjustable sights. I have a 45LC cylinder for the Uberti and they do not interchange between the two.
      You can also get them in .36 caliber and conversion cylinders in 38 special are available. You can get conversions for most black powder revolvers.
      The 1862 pocket navy and pocket police in .36 along with the 1849 in .31 were the pocket/concealed carry guns of their day
      What I would love to see would be an 1849 Baby Dragoon in 22LR. Basically the original Bearcat revolver.

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