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Degree of machining on receiver to be "firearm".

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  • #16
    Re: Degree of machining on receiver to be "firearm".

    Originally posted by Archangel2003 View Post
    Stating them as raw, meaning not 80% pieces?
    No, it means, no anodizing. It would just have the "raw" appearance.
    I guess I should just refer to them as such.
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    [CENTER][SIZE=1]“The more corrupt the republic, the more numerous the laws.”[/SIZE][/CENTER]

    [CENTER][SIZE=1]Publius Cornelius Tacitus[/SIZE][/CENTER]
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    • #17
      Re: Degree of machining on receiver to be "firearm".

      Type III hardcoat anodize?

      I'd just do the whole thing after machining - why anodize it twice?

      Where are you buying your stock? I buy round bar & not billet, but 7075 isn't 2.5x the cost of 6061 - maybe 1.5x at most. But billets may be more of a difference because it's much more material.

      I haven't noticed any difference machining 7075 vs 6061. Tools last as long, no noticebale need to change feeds/speeds (but I don't go fast to begin with.)
      They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.<br /><br />-- Benjamin Franklin

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      • #18
        Re: Degree of machining on receiver to be &quot;firearm&quot;.

        CMV, I agree on the anodizing. If a person were going t build immediately no problem. If they anticipated a lengthy delay or in high humidity conditions, then it might be a good idea.

        I'm buying in 12' lengths of 2x4 that I cut down.
        I have a shot at some titanium billets.
        I think I'll pass though.
        [CENTER][SIZE=1]“Corruptissima republica plurimae leges,”[/SIZE][/CENTER]
        [CENTER][SIZE=1]“The more corrupt the republic, the more numerous the laws.”[/SIZE][/CENTER]

        [CENTER][SIZE=1]Publius Cornelius Tacitus[/SIZE][/CENTER]
        [CENTER][SIZE=1][/SIZE] [/CENTER]
        [CENTER][SIZE=1]Sic Semper Tyrannis[/SIZE][/CENTER]

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        • #19
          Re: Degree of machining on receiver to be &quot;firearm&quot;.

          If you've never machined Ti you're in for a real "treat"

          I'm an amateur/hobbyist - not a machinist by any stretch of the imagination. But I've been tinkering around & made some silencer parts & other small projects using 6AL4V Ti. It's not an easy material to work with and machining a lower would be very challenging since that's so much material removal. Just cutting a 2x4 piece of stock would be interesting in a home shop. Nothing I own cut's the stuff & I'm only working with 1.5" round bar. The ONLY way I can cut it is to part it in the lathe.

          Makes 304 & 316 seem "easy" in comparison.

          Also on the pre-anodizing - if you (or end user) are going to engrave you'll chip away the hardcoat. I wouldn't bother offering it
          They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.<br /><br />-- Benjamin Franklin

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          • #20
            Re: Degree of machining on receiver to be &quot;firearm&quot;.

            How hard would it be to find someone that could hard coat anodize it once it finished?
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            • #21
              Re: Degree of machining on receiver to be &quot;firearm&quot;.

              Originally posted by CMV View Post
              If you've never machined Ti you're in for a real "treat"

              I'm an amateur/hobbyist - not a machinist by any stretch of the imagination. But I've been tinkering around & made some silencer parts & other small projects using 6AL4V Ti. It's not an easy material to work with and machining a lower would be very challenging since that's so much material removal. Just cutting a 2x4 piece of stock would be interesting in a home shop. Nothing I own cut's the stuff & I'm only working with 1.5" round bar. The ONLY way I can cut it is to part it in the lathe.
              I have some, but wasn't planning anything that extreme. There's absolutely zero way to justify the expense, other than to say I have one. But, dang, what a show & tell piece, huh?

              Makes 304 & 316 seem "easy" in comparison.

              Also on the pre-anodizing - if you (or end user) are going to engrave you'll chip away the hardcoat. I wouldn't bother offering it

              Heh, they're pretty hard, aren't they? It's why I maintain a good supply of the ceramic and carbide bits on hand.

              Yeah, you're probably right on the first anodize.

              I'm working on a business web-site for the items already being offered, along with those in planning.
              [CENTER][SIZE=1]“Corruptissima republica plurimae leges,”[/SIZE][/CENTER]
              [CENTER][SIZE=1]“The more corrupt the republic, the more numerous the laws.”[/SIZE][/CENTER]

              [CENTER][SIZE=1]Publius Cornelius Tacitus[/SIZE][/CENTER]
              [CENTER][SIZE=1][/SIZE] [/CENTER]
              [CENTER][SIZE=1]Sic Semper Tyrannis[/SIZE][/CENTER]

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              • #22
                Re: Degree of machining on receiver to be &quot;firearm&quot;.

                I would be interested in several of both calibers.

                And, as a licensed 07 FFL / C2 SOT, I can easily finish these for buyers who don't wish to purchase or rent equipment to complete them. This is probably the easiest way to obtain an AR receiver now, so the added cost of finishing an 80% lower outweighs the wait of a ready-to-go FFL piece that will be out of stock for a long time to come AFAIC.

                Iowegan, if you want to do some type of deal where you make the blanks and I do the machine work, that would be great. I'm just starting my business and would love to get into it a little more. I won't have AK parts kits to build forever at this rate, and the AR market is the place to be anyway. Send me a PM if you're interested.

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                • #23
                  Re: Degree of machining on receiver to be &quot;firearm&quot;.

                  PM sent
                  [CENTER][SIZE=1]“Corruptissima republica plurimae leges,”[/SIZE][/CENTER]
                  [CENTER][SIZE=1]“The more corrupt the republic, the more numerous the laws.”[/SIZE][/CENTER]

                  [CENTER][SIZE=1]Publius Cornelius Tacitus[/SIZE][/CENTER]
                  [CENTER][SIZE=1][/SIZE] [/CENTER]
                  [CENTER][SIZE=1]Sic Semper Tyrannis[/SIZE][/CENTER]

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                  • #24
                    Re: Degree of machining on receiver to be &quot;firearm&quot;.

                    You are pretty much in the clear with the 80% ARs as long as you follow the same thing that any of the higher profile 80% lower makers is following as far as "completeness" goes. Once you step outside of that, then it takes sending a sample in for approval.

                    There was a rumor about the guy at KT ordnance getting busted after I got busted, but is still allowed to be in the 80% receiver business. Since they are not firearms. He has one lower design that is a "bolt together" that departs from the generally accepted modern pattern of "80%" and it apparently was approved due to needing not so much more or less machine work, but on the totality of it, different machine work. From the looks of it, less milling, but more drilling and then some careful cutting which is not involved on the other designs.

                    Exterior contours don't seem to matter much, but it opens up some possibilities for a front/rear type of two piece lower with a bolt on or detachable magwell area that could get really interesting like the new model Colt rifle that has interchangeable magwells.

                    Breaking the AR lower design into a front/rear arrangement can get really interesting if it can be done since it opens up opportunities for a wider range of caliber and magazines configurations. It also means you could have a perfectly legal "single shot" or "fixed magazine" lower that can have the magwell area swapped out after initial construction, but in its as-built form, could be for a single shot or bolt action rifle, or something with no magazine at all.

                    Possible configurations:

                    .308 magwell, (long reciever configuration)
                    shotgun mag (Saiga style) magwell (long reciever configuration)
                    NATO STANAG magwell, uses regular M16 mags.
                    AK74 mag compatible magwell
                    AK47 mag compatible magwell
                    G36 compatible magwell
                    AUG compatible magwell (for your Australian friends).
                    9mm compatible magwells made to match various pistol mag configurations
                    fixed magazine capacity magwell with a mechanical side feed.
                    ejection port only magwell (for the FN 5.7 uppers)
                    Ruger 10/22 style magwell.
                    Last edited by RT; February 23, 2013, 00:59.
                    Life, Liberty and the pursuit of those who threaten them.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Degree of machining on receiver to be &quot;firearm&quot;.

                      After some catastrophic failure with machinery, I've got chips flying again.

                      There is another post about cheap lowers and jigs.

                      I gotta say, they cant be making anything doing what they're doing. But its hard to beat that kind of price.
                      They're selling them for less than I can obtain a single billet, and that with me buying a 12' piece and cutting and milling...
                      [CENTER][SIZE=1]“Corruptissima republica plurimae leges,”[/SIZE][/CENTER]
                      [CENTER][SIZE=1]“The more corrupt the republic, the more numerous the laws.”[/SIZE][/CENTER]

                      [CENTER][SIZE=1]Publius Cornelius Tacitus[/SIZE][/CENTER]
                      [CENTER][SIZE=1][/SIZE] [/CENTER]
                      [CENTER][SIZE=1]Sic Semper Tyrannis[/SIZE][/CENTER]

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