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CALLING ALL STOCK REFINISHERS!

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  • CALLING ALL STOCK REFINISHERS!

    I need some help. I recently purchased a pair of factory Sig grips for my P220 from CDNN. I think they were probably factory seconds. One, because the price was 40% off Sigs price and two, they were pretty rough out of the box.

    There was a couple of spots where the checkering file hit the border and nicked it and they had not been finish sanded. I think they gave up on them after nicking them.

    Anyway I finish sanded them by hand using a 240, 360, 500, and 1000 grit paper on the smooth areas of the panels. I was just going to wax them, but I wanted a hi-gloss finish so I used Min-Wax Polyurathane. Now, I've had good luck with using this stuff in the past.

    This time after the first thin coat the grips have these little bitty pin-point bumps in some areas. I brushed the grips off before coating and I tacked them off too. This is got me scratching my head. The temp in the basement is at 70F and humidity is at 49%.

    I'm looking for that hi-gloss finish that you find on expensive trap and skeet shotguns and hi-end rifles.

    Can someone offer some suggestion on what might be causing this and a corrective action?

    This is the second time I've done this. The first time was not good at all. This time is not nearly as bad, but I can still see those tiny pin point like bumps in some spots.

    ?????????????

    ------------------
    "It was people who upheld their duties to their office, the constitution, and the public by opposing Hitler who were called traitors"
    -------------------------------------
    "...a historian asked what had happened to the German people for them to accept a criminal government. Unfortunately, nothing needed to happen. In nations across the world people accept government crime."
    -------------------------------------
    "In democracies as well as dictatorships, subordinates illegally obey their rulers. Subordinates who remain true to their oaths of office by opposing their rulers are rare."
    [I]Peace Through Strength, Victory Through Devastation...Strategic Air Command[/I]

    American by birth, made from German parts from Emmingen, Baden-Württemberg

    An unhappy German is a Sour Kraut!

    Das Leben ist zu kurz, um billiges Bier zu trinken!

  • #2
    Herr Walther
    I bet you are using a brush.

    Try spray Polyurathane.

    Comment


    • #3
      I did. A natural bristle brush 1" wide.

      I've never though about using a spray finish. I didn't think it would hold up as well as a brushed finish.

      The grips are dry now but not yet cured. I guess they look OK. I'll try the spray on the next set. I hope the Min-Wax comes in an aerosol.

      ------------------
      "It was people who upheld their duties to their office, the constitution, and the public by opposing Hitler who were called traitors"
      -------------------------------------
      "...a historian asked what had happened to the German people for them to accept a criminal government. Unfortunately, nothing needed to happen. In nations across the world people accept government crime."
      -------------------------------------
      "In democracies as well as dictatorships, subordinates illegally obey their rulers. Subordinates who remain true to their oaths of office by opposing their rulers are rare."
      [I]Peace Through Strength, Victory Through Devastation...Strategic Air Command[/I]

      American by birth, made from German parts from Emmingen, Baden-Württemberg

      An unhappy German is a Sour Kraut!

      Das Leben ist zu kurz, um billiges Bier zu trinken!

      Comment


      • #4
        Tru-oil by birchwood casey - use your finger to apply in thin coats, allow 24 hours drying time between coats, and rub with very fine steel wool between and clean with denatured alcohal before re-application.

        This is the same method used by the US Marine Corps Silent Drill Team and presidential honor guard on their M1 garands.

        I have used this method with great sucess in the past. much better finish than any poly-urethane will ever give.

        Warning, your hands must be clean, and you must hang/set the piece in room with little or no dust (bathroom is great!)

        HTH! and Good luck!

        ------------------
        DEO VINDICE!
        Motstå

        Comment


        • #5
          If you are dead set on polyurethane, you have to thin it, rub it in with a lint free cloth or your fingers, then hang it in a closeable cardboard box. Use fine steel wool between coats. AND HAVE PATIENCE! Fine work cannot be hurried.


          ------------------
          If you must be a rock, be a precious stone.
          If you would be a bird, be a white dove.
          But if you are to be a human being, then be a revolutionary.


          Remember, last one out turns off the lights.

          Comment


          • #6
            No, I wasn't dead set on the polyurathane. It's just that that's the only thing I knew of that would give me the gloss I was looking for.

            AK-74, does the B-C True Oil produce the mirror finish I'm looking for or is it more of a satin finish?

            Dan, I'll try your suggestion on the next set of grips I do if I decide on the polyurathane for them.

            Last night after the first coat dried about 2200, I hit them with some 0000 steel wool and used a small modeling brush to go over them again. I made sure I had a wet edge on every pass. After the poly settled out they looked pretty good.

            This morning they look really good. Not quite cured yet I don't think, but they look a lot better than right after they dried last night. The finish is mirror shiny and most of the little pin-point bumps dissappeared or are very difficult to see unless you get your face right down to them.

            I guess this was a learning lesson in using polyurathane.

            Thanks for your tips and suggestions. I refinish more firearms than I do wood. Metal is not so tempramental as long as it's clean.

            If you guys have anything to add, please share.

            Thanks.

            ------------------
            "It was people who upheld their duties to their office, the constitution, and the public by opposing Hitler who were called traitors"
            -------------------------------------
            "...a historian asked what had happened to the German people for them to accept a criminal government. Unfortunately, nothing needed to happen. In nations across the world people accept government crime."
            -------------------------------------
            "In democracies as well as dictatorships, subordinates illegally obey their rulers. Subordinates who remain true to their oaths of office by opposing their rulers are rare."
            [I]Peace Through Strength, Victory Through Devastation...Strategic Air Command[/I]

            American by birth, made from German parts from Emmingen, Baden-Württemberg

            An unhappy German is a Sour Kraut!

            Das Leben ist zu kurz, um billiges Bier zu trinken!

            Comment


            • #7
              Birchwood casey Trueoil is great for bringing out the color and grain on fine gunstocks....as long as you are gentle with it. Urethane topcoats are tough as nails! A few coats of urethane from a rattle can over the BC will give you a beautiful gun that can take lots of abuse!
              Ahab

              Comment


              • #8
                <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Herr Walther:
                No, I wasn't dead set on the polyurathane. It's just that that's the only thing I knew of that would give me the gloss I was looking for.

                AK-74, does the B-C True Oil produce the mirror finish I'm looking for or is it more of a satin finish?

                Dan, I'll try your suggestion on the next set of grips I do if I decide on the polyurathane for them.

                Last night after the first coat dried about 2200, I hit them with some 0000 steel wool and used a small modeling brush to go over them again. I made sure I had a wet edge on every pass. After the poly settled out they looked pretty good.

                This morning they look really good. Not quite cured yet I don't think, but they look a lot better than right after they dried last night. The finish is mirror shiny and most of the little pin-point bumps dissappeared or are very difficult to see unless you get your face right down to them.

                I guess this was a learning lesson in using polyurathane.

                Thanks for your tips and suggestions. I refinish more firearms than I do wood. Metal is not so tempramental as long as it's clean.

                If you guys have anything to add, please share.

                Thanks.

                <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                High Gloss finish. If you use wax on it, it will make it more satin.

                Not the best photo, but you can see it is a gloss finish.


                ------------------
                DEO VINDICE!
                Motstå

                Comment


                • #9
                  Resand. Use very fine steel wool and clean good. Use small blow torch over grips (this will fry minute imperfections), re clean and use SPRAY polyurethane.

                  ------------------
                  ..MrM
                  Kentucky Proud! Been there, done that! The sheeple WILL flock to the protectors' fold in time of need. I am a protector.

                  Eighty-Six MILLION legally armed Americans caused NO harm yesterday.
                  Youth And Brawn Are No Match For Age And Treachery.
                  I'm Old And May Not Fight. I'll Shoot Instead.

                  USMC 1959/1963

                  Comment

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