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  • Brownells spray on finish

    Just re-finished my AMT .45 Backup with their spray on finish. Turned out pretty damn good. Follow instructions then you bake your parts for 30 minutes at 300 degrees. I didn't want to spend alot of money on a finish job so I gave it a try. First time I've ever done anything like that.

  • #2
    MRAK >>>

    Was it the Spray on "GunKote" Finish from Brownells? I am prepping an old Ruger Security Six and I am considering purchasing the Finish.

    Death Merchant

    ------------------
    "Respect, Honor, Discipline" Values for Life!
    \"Respect, Honor, Discipline\" ....My Values for Life!

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    • #3
      The Gunkote is a little harder to apply because its thinnner. The other stuff is easier to apply but its you have more of a chance washing out some of the lettering on the gun.

      Do you have a compressor and a spray gun? If so you are better off ordering a pint directly from Gunkote so you arent paying for mostly propellant.

      <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DEATHMERCHANT308:
      MRAK &gt;&gt;&gt;

      Was it the Spray on "GunKote" Finish from Brownells? I am prepping an old Ruger Security Six and I am considering purchasing the Finish.

      Death Merchant

      <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

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      • #4
        I've done several handguns and my G3 with Brownell's Moly-Cote and all have turned out great.

        The G3 turned out better looking that original finish H&K's I've seen.

        ------------------
        "It was people who upheld their duties to their office, the constitution, and the public by opposing Hitler who were called traitors"
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        "...a historian asked what had happened to the German people for them to accept a criminal government. Unfortunately, nothing needed to happen. In nations across the world people accept government crime."
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        [I]Peace Through Strength, Victory Through Devastation...Strategic Air Command[/I]

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        • #5
          It was the moly-cote. I use the grey. Take your time, hang your parts in the oven with wire from the oven rack.

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          • #6
            One thing I'd like to know is will the heat of baking detemper springs?
            I'm buying a snub Ruger Service 6 in .357 that's mechanically great but the finish is worn. I'll use Teflon Moly on it but some springs will be difficult to take out. If they're safe from the heat I'll leave them in.

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            • #7
              To apply the coating properly you have to take all the springs and pins out. If not any oil left will seep out when curing and ruin the finish.

              The best way Ive found to disassemble a gun for the first time is to do it a few pieces at a time, then put it back together then take apart a few more. Usually Ill take out the different assemblies one at a time and learn how to reinstall them before moving on to another assembly. Dont take the whole gun apart all at once because odds are youll end up taking it to a 'smith for reassembly.

              Be carefull with the pawl plunger and spring in your ruger. You lift up the Pawl and usually the plunger and spring come shooting out and disappear, believe me Ive made this mistake. Look at the link to the exploded drawing below and youll see what Im talking about. The best way to disassemble it for the first time would be to place the gun in a clear plastic bag when removing the trigger assembly, this way your sure not to loose parts. The Pawl is #43 on the drawing and the pawl plunger and spring are numbers 44 and 45. If you get jammed up let me know.
              http://kile_r.tripod.com/Rugsec6.jpg

              Cant link to the site, just copy the url into your browser.
              <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by MikeG:
              One thing I'd like to know is will the heat of baking detemper springs?
              I'm buying a snub Ruger Service 6 in .357 that's mechanically great but the finish is worn. I'll use Teflon Moly on it but some springs will be difficult to take out. If they're safe from the heat I'll leave them in.
              <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>



              [This message has been edited by LoneGunman (edited 05 February 2002).]

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              • #8
                I guess I'll take the time and do it right instead of being lazy. In the meantime I may find something to use as a test piece for practice before I do the revolver.

                Thanks folks
                Mike

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                • #9
                  I left my springs in. Firing pin and hammer spring. The old .45 backup is purring like a kitten. It's only 30 minutes at 300 degrees. That's not going to hurt nothing. I cleaned all my parts with mineral spirits prior to finishing and baking. Mineral spirits does a good job. do not spray the gun until you have gotten all the oil and grease off. As Lonegunman has said the oil will screw up the new finish by seeping.

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                  • #10
                    MRAK1289, bet your wife was pissed when she went to use the oven and everything tastes like sulpher!

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