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Beretta semi-auto not cycling

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  • Beretta semi-auto not cycling

    I bought a Beretta semi auto "vitory"? about 4 yrs ago... the thing's been sitting in the gun safe since them.

    this weekend i went on a men's retreat with the men of our church and there was clay pidgeon shooting as one of the elective activities...

    The shotgun fires FLAWLESSLY as a singleshot.

    it will not reload a new shell ... Neither MANUALLY NOR IN FIRE MODE...

    what do YPOU think the problem could be?

  • #2
    Gas leak? I'm not familiar with the Berettas internals, but if it is gas operated you might remove the forearm and look for carbon in some place it shouldn't be. I've seen 1100 Remingtons do this from rust in and on the gas system, also. It does kick out the empty hull? Still could be short stroking from either of the above possibilities.
    "some people never let their given word interfere if something they want comes along"
    The real problem with the world are laws preventing culling.

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    • #3
      My Beretta was recoil operated, looked almost identical to the Benelli Super 90 system. If I recall the instruction required the use of at least a 1 1/8oz field load for proper functioning.

      Steve.

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      • #4
        Antibabylon,

        here's my thoughts on this - I have been shooting a nice, reliable AL390 for years at the Trap&Skeet range and know the gas system pretty well. If yours is like the AL390, then here's what might be happening:

        Unscrew the fore-end cap under the barrel that holds the stock on. When you lift the cap off the stock tip there SHOULD be a small spring sticking up through the stock into the underside of the cap. That's what holds a small round metal pressure plate against gas vents/openings at the top of the gas/piston chamber. When pressures are high, they push the metal pressure plate against the spring tension to release excess. It's important and allows the system to fire any light 2/34 load to heavy 3' magnum load without adjustment, and prevents damage to the gas piston system and to the action.

        If that spring is missing, the pressure plate is not held against the vents, and ALL the gas tapped into that chamber will be released before it can impinge on the piston.

        That's my best guess. Otherwise, hose the sucker down inside (especially the piston) with breakfree. Failing these steps, the Beretta service shop in Accokeek, Maryland is pretty excellent. best of luck on those clays.

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        • #5
          I had a beretta FP1201 semi-auto and the thing would not function with anything but heavy loads.

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