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25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

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  • Reb
    started a topic 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    This is an interesting site. It tries to shine the light on evil since before the 1st Century. The people who run the site research historical facts, geography and other sources. These lists of most evil people start in the 1st Century. The list below is for the 20th Century. You can go to the site and look at the rest of them.

    I was surprised by some of the names on the list but after reading about these people I am no longer surprised as to why they were chosen.

    25 Most Evil People
    20th Century (1900 - 2000 CE)

    1. Pope Pius X
    2. Franz Xavier Wernz S.J.
    3. Pope Benedict XV
    4. Pope Pius XII
    5. Wlodimir Ledochowski S.J.
    6. Bernhardt Staempfle S.J.
    7. Fr. Joseph Stalin S. J.
    8. Adolf Hitler
    9. Benito Mussolini
    10. Francisco Franco
    11. Dwight D. Eisenhower
    12. Jean-Baptiste Janssens S.J.
    13. Pope Paul VI
    14. Heinrich Himmler
    15. Pope Pius XI
    16. Pedro Arrupe S.J.
    17. Edmund A. Walsh S.J.
    18. Joseph P. Kennedy
    19. Cardinal Francis Spellman
    20. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr
    21. Dr Chaim Sheba
    22. Franklin D. Roosevelt
    23. Edward VII of England
    24. Ante Pavelić
    25. Mao Zedong

    Here is the site link - One Evil

    This page is to the bllodlines of evil via century starting with the 1st Century- Bloodline(s) of Evil

    There's a lot more like evil entities throughout history, ect.

  • ISC
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    I think Mannlicher hit the nail on the head.
    Teddy Roosevelt, seriously?

    This list is the stupidist thing I've seen in a long time.

    Leave a comment:


  • thirty-thirty
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    I think Rothschild, FDR, LBJ, Soros, Henry Kissinger, Rockefeller, Richard Perle, Michael Chertoff, Alan Greenspan, Ben Bernanke, Sumner Redstone, Stalin, Lenin and Marx belong on that list.

    Leave a comment:


  • kARL
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    I got it.
    Note that he reports Stalin to have been a SJ?
    That is the society of Jesus.


    The new pope is a member of that order.

    Therefore the new pope who is Conservative and hated by the liberals is one with stalin.

    A hack job.

    karl

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Pete
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    What nonsense! the murderers of multi million people..Stalin & Mao is last. PLEASE!

    Leave a comment:


  • kARL
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    I would tend to wonder why some did not make that list as well.
    karl

    Leave a comment:


  • Mannlicher
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    when you get a handle on what agenda folks are pushing, it becomes more clear, why they put up stuff like this.

    No Pol Pot? No muslims at all? WTF are these folks thinking?

    evidently Frank O'Collins is the lunatic behind "One Evil.org"

    http://www.ucadia.com/frank/frank.htm
    Last edited by Mannlicher; March 16th, 2013, 20:07.

    Leave a comment:


  • jefferson101
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    While I'm not Catholic, and have no notable brief for the Catholic faith, I'm going to have to say that anyone who can list that many Popes and suchlike that high on that list has some kind of issue with them.

    Such being the case, I have to suspect their agenda.

    Anyone who makes that kind of list and can leave out Pol Pot, or Fidel, or Che, or Marx, or Lenin, or J. Edgar Hoover (Maybe not him, just checking to see if you are still reading this....), clearly has issues with Catholics.

    What the flop did Francisco Franco ever do to get on that list? Or how did he get there instead of Chou-En-Lai, for instance?

    The whole thing looks a bit reality-challenged, to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wood Devil
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    Originally posted by ah1g View Post
    WHAT! No obama.
    Obama is considered by many a savior, the living embodiment of God. They will now and forever remain ignorant to his true self, the anti-Christ.

    Leave a comment:


  • ah1g
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    WHAT! No obama.

    Leave a comment:


  • Reb
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    Originally posted by Wood Devil View Post
    Lot of Popes on there.
    They have a page explaining that.

    You have to remember that back during those times a Pope was like government, a ruler.

    Leave a comment:


  • bunflinger
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    Surprised Tojo didn't make the list or LBJ even.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wood Devil
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    Lot of Popes on there.

    And why no Soros?

    Leave a comment:


  • Reb
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    He also said this in his farewell speech. Someone needs to tell our current politician this again because they are robbing our children and grandchildren.

    Another factor in maintaining balance involves the element of time. As we peer into society's future, we -- you and I, and our government -- must avoid the impulse to live only for today, plundering, for our own ease and convenience, the precious resources of tomorrow. We cannot mortgage the material assets of our grandchildren without risking the loss also of their political and spiritual heritage. We want democracy to survive for all generations to come, not to become the insolvent phantom of tomorrow.

    Leave a comment:


  • Reb
    replied
    Re: 25 Most Evil People of the 20th Century

    Like I said I was surprised by some of the name on the 20th Century list. One that really surprised me was Eisenhower, until I read more about him. Then it kind of made sense. His actions prolonged WWII and seemed intentional. Maybe that's why later after he got older and had a conscience he warned us about the coming 'Military Industrial Complex'. He had been a part of that very thing. He made the statements about it in his farewell speech when he was leaving the office of the presidency.

    Here's the whole one page speech:

    http://coursesa.matrix.msu.edu/~hst3...ts/indust.html

    Here's the part of the speech where he warned us:

    Until the latest of our world conflicts, the United States had no armaments industry. American makers of plowshares could, with time and as required, make swords as well. But now we can no longer risk emergency improvisation of national defense; we have been compelled to create a permanent armaments industry of vast proportions. Added to this, three and a half million men and women are directly engaged in the defense establishment. We annually spend on military security more than the net income of all United States corporations.

    This conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience. The total influence -- economic, political, even spiritual -- is felt in every city, every State house, every office of the Federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources and livelihood are all involved; so is the very structure of our society.

    In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.

    We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.

    Akin to, and largely responsible for the sweeping changes in our industrial-military posture, has been the technological revolution during recent decades.

    In this revolution, research has become central; it also becomes more formalized, complex, and costly. A steadily increasing share is conducted for, by, or at the direction of, the Federal government.

    Today, the solitary inventor, tinkering in his shop, has been overshadowed by task forces of scientists in laboratories and testing fields. In the same fashion, the free university, historically the fountainhead of free ideas and scientific discovery, has experienced a revolution in the conduct of research. Partly because of the huge costs involved, a government contract becomes virtually a substitute for intellectual curiosity. For every old blackboard there are now hundreds of new electronic computers.

    The prospect of domination of the nation's scholars by Federal employment, project allocations, and the power of money is ever present

    • and is gravely to be regarded.

    Yet, in holding scientific research and discovery in respect, as we should, we must also be alert to the equal and opposite danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientific technological elite.

    It is the task of statesmanship to mold, to balance, and to integrate these and other forces, new and old, within the principles of our democratic system -- ever aiming toward the supreme goals of our free society.

    Leave a comment:

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