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I don't care for striker fired weapons

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  • I don't care for striker fired weapons

    I honestly am not trying to insult anybody. If you like this type of weapon I am glad for you. Personally I am not a fan and have the statistics to prove that they are not safe.

    How many times in the news do you see these kinds of firearms having an AD or UD with serious consequences.

    https://www.kgw.com/article/news/loc.../283-569090275

    They are dangerous to owners and bystanders (most recent the Dancing FBI Moron)

    To be honest if the guy wasn't there to stop the fight someone else would have been shot and all because the person didn't handle the firearm in a safe manner. I know you have seen the SIG design flaw where the firearm will discharge with a simple tap, so I am not only pointing out the Glock UN-Safe-T plastic pistol.
    Last edited by Harlock; July 1st, 2018, 09:37. Reason: Weird the link posted twice and I believe the software reverted to a saved entry so I fixed it
    Call me John the all knowing cryptic of the obvious and obscure.

  • #2
    Yea........they are basically always "hot". Sure, they have the little pecker in the trigger, but that does not constitute as being a "safety" to me. Anything that finds its way into the trigger guard, is OBVIOUSLY going to push that in first......and then the trigger!!

    So.......they are akin to carrying a 1911 with the grip safety pinned, hammer back and the safety off!! EEK!!!

    One REALLY needs to step up their handling protocol, with the striker fired pistols!!
    And I saw thrones, and they sat upon them, and judgement was given unto them: and I saw the souls of them that were beheaded for the witness of Jesus, and for the word of God, and which had not worshipped the beast, neither his image, neither had received his mark upon their foreheads, or in their hands: and they lived and reigned with Christ a thousand years. Rev. Chap.20 Vs.4)

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    • #3
      Some striker fired handguns are available with manual external safeties, (EG the M&P Shield). I've never had an issue with a striker fired handgun per-se, but anything that doesn't have a manual external safety is strictly a range gun for me. I wouldn't carry one.
      Alle Kunst ist umsunst Wenn ein Engel auf das Zundloch brunzet (All skill is in vain if an angel pisses down the touch-hole of your musket.) Old German Folk Wisdom.

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      • #4
        Another reason the PPS doesn't see a lot of holster time.

        On the other hand, the striker fired Walther P99 has a traditional DA/SA trigger that is as safe as carrying any SIG-Sauer or revolver.
        Peace Through Strength, Victory Through Devastation...Strategic Air Command

        American by birth, made from German parts from Emmingen, Baden-Württemberg

        An unhappy German is a Sour Kraut!

        Das Leben ist zu kurz, um billiges Bier zu trinken!

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        • #5
          Any gun is dangerous if owned by an idiot. One reason we see a lot more striker fired ADs is that there are a lot more striker fired guns out there in use. There might be more hammer guns in safes and such, but most every day users, use a striker fired weapon.

          A revolver doesn't have a safety either..... At least none of mine do. Watching that FBI agent, I believe if he'd grabbed a revolver like that it would have gone off.

          I like hammer guns. I like striker guns. I like revolvers. I like semi-autos. I like full autos. I don't discriminate.

          And don't give me that John Browning crap, Browning made just as many striker fired pistols as guns with hammers.
          How miserable that man is that governs a People where six parts of seven at least are poor, indebted, discontented, and armed. - William Berkley... Royal Governor of the Colony of Virginia (1670'ish).

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          • #6
            One report stands out because it showcases the statistics for "Firearms Trained police officers" right after they switched from old school to the striker fired weapons. The FBI statistics are much worse.

            https://oig.lacounty.gov/Portals/OIG...e%20Report.pdf

            If you like the weapons and feel comfortable that is good. I do feel bad for the CCW trainer that blew his artery out in front of his family while getting into the car. I just want to caution you that the information is out there, You will never get the data from Glock or S&W or any other seller of striker fired weapons it's bad press. All it takes is one screw up or defect and someone can die, worse what happens when the weapon doesn't discharge and the statistics are there for that as well. Striker fire weapons have more FTF than hammer-n-pin spring designs. (The MFG's of striker weapons point to hard primers and ammo defects; however, same ammo different discharge mechanism and it's not the ammo's fault)
            Call me John the all knowing cryptic of the obvious and obscure.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Southern Shark View Post
              Any gun is dangerous if owned by an idiot. One reason we see a lot more striker fired ADs is that there are a lot more striker fired guns out there in use. There might be more hammer guns in safes and such, but most every day users, use a striker fired weapon.

              A revolver doesn't have a safety either..... At least none of mine do. Watching that FBI agent, I believe if he'd grabbed a revolver like that it would have gone off.

              I like hammer guns. I like striker guns. I like revolvers. I like semi-autos. I like full autos. I don't discriminate.

              And don't give me that John Browning crap, Browning made just as many striker fired pistols as guns with hammers.
              Give That Man A Ceegar! That's really the point, isn't it? Any handgun in the hands of an untrained, unPRACTICED, or distracted individual is much more prone to have an AD/ND.

              My handgun of choice for EDC is a Hi Power carried condition 1. It's on my hip right now as I am typing this. I carry it in a leather IWB holster, I've practiced enough that I always sweep the safety off on the draw, and I even use the old-fashioned small one-sided safety because l experienced the newer ambi extended safety getting inadvertantly swept off during carry. My biggest worry, however, if I should ever have to draw the pistol in a real defensive situation is, in a likely adrenalin flushed state of mind, forgetting to apply the safety when I re holster it and shoot myself in the butt cheek.
              Freedom Of Speech does not include freedom from consequences.

              When riding a horse, remember that you are not in control, but are just another voting member.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Harlock View Post
                One report stands out because it showcases the statistics for "Firearms Trained police officers" right after they switched from old school to the striker fired weapons. The FBI statistics are much worse.

                https://oig.lacounty.gov/Portals/OIG...e%20Report.pdf

                If you like the weapons and feel comfortable that is good. I do feel bad for the CCW trainer that blew his artery out in front of his family while getting into the car. I just want to caution you that the information is out there, You will never get the data from Glock or S&W or any other seller of striker fired weapons it's bad press. All it takes is one screw up or defect and someone can die, worse what happens when the weapon doesn't discharge and the statistics are there for that as well. Striker fire weapons have more FTF than hammer-n-pin spring designs. (The MFG's of striker weapons point to hard primers and ammo defects; however, same ammo different discharge mechanism and it's not the ammo's fault)
                Here is an example of what Harlock is talking about:

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zObETVQvI1w

                Freedom Of Speech does not include freedom from consequences.

                When riding a horse, remember that you are not in control, but are just another voting member.

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                • #9
                  You've got to consider that many people went from years and years of DA/SA to something a little different, so yeah, that will lead to more issues. Probably same argument made when many agencies switched from revolvers to autoloaders as it was not what the carriers were accustomed to. For years and years, everything I had was DA/SA and was comfortable with that - even with no manual frame safety. So I didn't much care about striker-fired. Wasn't what I was accustomed to, and what I had been using worked just fine. However, after finally getting a few, I love them just the same as their older siblings To just dismiss wholesale a great shooting weapon like HK VP9 or an incredibly budget-friendly Canik TP9 just because they are striker fired is a bit narrow minded IMHO
                  They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.

                  -- Benjamin Franklin

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                  • #10
                    There's really nothing wrong with striker fired handguns, with the exception of generally lighter primer strikes. Actually I believe that almost every handgun that Saint John designed was striker fired, with the exception being the 1911. (Some will think I've forgotten the Hi Power, but Browning's patent drawings and his prototype were striker fired. When Mr. Browning passed away at his workbench at the FN plant in Belgium on November 26, 1926, and at the time the patents had not yet been issued. That happened, if memory serves correctly, in March of 1927, and at that point Mr. Dieudonne Saive, Mr. Brownings assistant at FN, took over and completed the design.

                    My issue is strictly the reliance on the little dongle in the trigger of a lot of these guns, and mostly that's the root cause of a lot of the ADs with these guns - has nothing to do with the gun being striker fired.

                    I did have a Glock 21 once - bought it from a policeman friend who no longer needed it. That particular Glock came with one of the New York Triggers. That modification consisted of a heavier sear spring and a steeper ramp on the connecter. It had a quite heavy DA pull that actually reminded me of a DA revolver. This modification came about in response to the number of ADs experienced by NYPD officers when that agency started issuing Glocks to replace their old .38 revolvers. (I bought the two parts required and swapped it back to the normal Glock trigger, but I never carried the gun, and sold it sbout two years ago to a co-worker.
                    Freedom Of Speech does not include freedom from consequences.

                    When riding a horse, remember that you are not in control, but are just another voting member.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Chief351 View Post
                      There's really nothing wrong with striker fired handguns, with the exception of generally lighter primer strikes. Actually I believe that almost every handgun that Saint John designed was striker fired, with the exception being the 1911. (Some will think I've forgotten the Hi Power, but Browning's patent drawings and his prototype were striker fired. When Mr. Browning passed away at his workbench at the FN plant in Belgium on November 26, 1926, and at the time the patents had not yet been issued. That happened, if memory serves correctly, in March of 1927, and at that point Mr. Dieudonne Saive, Mr. Brownings assistant at FN, took over and completed the design.

                      My issue is strictly the reliance on the little dongle in the trigger of a lot of these guns, and mostly that's the root cause of a lot of the ADs with these guns - has nothing to do with the gun being striker fired.

                      I did have a Glock 21 once - bought it from a policeman friend who no longer needed it. That particular Glock came with one of the New York Triggers. That modification consisted of a heavier sear spring and a steeper ramp on the connecter. It had a quite heavy DA pull that actually reminded me of a DA revolver. This modification came about in response to the number of ADs experienced by NYPD officers when that agency started issuing Glocks to replace their old .38 revolvers. (I bought the two parts required and swapped it back to the normal Glock trigger, but I never carried the gun, and sold it sbout two years ago to a co-worker.
                      Nope, all the guns he designed for Colt had hammers. Guns he designed for FN were striker fired. Browning always made two patents, one of each type, so that he could double his $$$. Smart man. There are two 1903's for example, one with hammers for Colt and one that is striker fired for FN. There is the FN 1906, striker fired, and the Colt 1908, with hammers. Externally, the guns look the same, except for the hammer. He made other guns as well this way (obviously). His most popular striker gun was the FN 1910 in .380 and .32 ACP, although the Hi-Power would have obviously far exceeded it had FN kept it striker fired as Browning intended.
                      How miserable that man is that governs a People where six parts of seven at least are poor, indebted, discontented, and armed. - William Berkley... Royal Governor of the Colony of Virginia (1670'ish).

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Southern Shark View Post

                        Nope, all the guns he designed for Colt had hammers. Guns he designed for FN were striker fired. Browning always made two patents, one of each type, so that he could double his $$$. Smart man. There are two 1903's for example, one with hammers for Colt and one that is striker fired for FN. There is the FN 1906, striker fired, and the Colt 1908, with hammers. Externally, the guns look the same, except for the hammer. He made other guns as well this way (obviously). His most popular striker gun was the FN 1910 in .380 and .32 ACP, although the Hi-Power would have obviously far exceeded it had FN kept it striker fired as Browning intended.
                        You're right. I stand corrected. The majority were hammer fired, although there were a few hammerless ones mixed in. I guess I had a senior moment there.
                        Freedom Of Speech does not include freedom from consequences.

                        When riding a horse, remember that you are not in control, but are just another voting member.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Chief351 View Post

                          You're right. I stand corrected. The majority were hammer fired, although there were a few hammerless ones mixed in. I guess I had a senior moment there.
                          well he made 4 guns for FN that are all striker fired. His first pistol was striker fired. His guns for Colt were hammer fired, and there are a few more models, although many of them are just differences in barrel length. Browning's first pistol, the FN 1900, was striker fired and he intended the Hi-Power to be striker fired. So I'd say it's close to 50-50. As noted, Colt does have more models, but a lot of them are basically the same gun.
                          How miserable that man is that governs a People where six parts of seven at least are poor, indebted, discontented, and armed. - William Berkley... Royal Governor of the Colony of Virginia (1670'ish).

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