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For the Remington 700 experts....

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  • For the Remington 700 experts....

    I am trying to find why my 700 ADL w/factory wood stock is not free floated, instead is has a "hump" made into the stock the exerts enough pressure thats its actually wearing the metal finish off the underside of the barrel. This hump is fiberglassed, about an inch and one half long, about midway between muzzle and chamber. Funny, I've ALWAYS thought fully free floated barrels shot best. This rifle has never shot all that well, typical three shot groups run about 1.5", never had any factory or handload do better. This rifle is about 20 years old, not one of the junkers produced now,
    "some people never let their given word interfere if something they want comes along"
    The real problem with the world are laws preventing culling.

  • #2
    Re: For the Remington 700 experts....

    There is a school of thought that a 'consistant' pressure at ONE point of contact is just as good as free floated. I did NOT believe it until I once fired a friends of mines gun in both a free floated stock and the same gun in a stock with a contact point. it actually shot BETTER with the point of contact.

    Different guns require different things.

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    • #3
      Re: For the Remington 700 experts....

      A couple times I've given thought of neutering this one since it does not shoot as well as most older 700's I've fired. This one may need a new stock and barrel job to ever shoot.
      "some people never let their given word interfere if something they want comes along"
      The real problem with the world are laws preventing culling.

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      • #4
        Re: For the Remington 700 experts....

        So what is that ADL.. 70's maybe early 80s,(70's most likely), when high-speed cams were just being introduced into the gun makers design depts..

        Pressuring the bbl was a quick fix to reduce bbl whip on the lighter contour bbl'ed hunting rifles, by bringing it into the 1.5-moa range, and still try to counter some of the micro-vibration through the length of the bbl.

        Most of rem's rifles were set with the end of the stock pressuring the bbl, but stock-warp eventually made this inconsistant in time and through the various range of hunting conditions thoughout the US.

        It really got rough on Rem when their very own rifle lines were competing for the accuracy market, (such as the cheaper made 700 lines vs the slightly more expensive to make, but more accurate 788 lines rifles).
        Their own people looked for and found little 'cheats' that would lend to their rifle lines accurace with little added costs.

        Eventually they played with different bore cuts, and bbl thicknesses,(med contour bbls and 5r cuts, etc)... of course on the cheaper made lines such as the 700 series where there was a bit more marginal room to work.

        .

        Restock, re'bbl, and true the action & bolt... and the rifle will then be capable of sub-moa. ...it's only money... that Rem couldn't bring themselves to spend making the rifle the first time.

        .

        Michael
        Last edited by C. M. Wolf; November 12th, 2012, 01:53.

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